Asian Vegetable Seeds

    Broad Bean

    aka sora mame, tsaam dou, patani, bakla
  • #006 NIN TOKU GIANT - (70 to 90 days)

  • Broad beans are known as Fava beans. This variety is a vigorous grower and has heavy yields of uniform pods that hold at least 3 large vivid green seeds. While tasty and tender, they are also high in nutrients, including protein, iron and potassium. Recommended for both fresh market and home garden. These sweet, tasty beans can be parboiled and then stir-fried in oil with garlic. Boil beans in salty water and serve as an appetizer or add to salad
  • Hyacinth Bean
  • aka fujimame, bian dou, bataw, dau vang
    Warning: Hyacinth beans naturally have cyanogenic glucoside (a plant compound that contains sugar and produces cyanide.) Hyacinth beans should never be eaten raw by humans or animals.
    Always cook hyacinth beans well before eating because heat alters the cyanogenic glucosides.
  • #206 AKAHANA FUJIMAME - (90 to 100 days)

  • Hyacinth bean is a tropical plant and likes warm climate. This variety is a beautiful green-leafed climber with magenta flowers. It is a popular variety with edible pods that are flat, thick and curved. The vine is vigorous and needs to be supported. Also grown as an ornamental plant in the garden. Young pods can be sliced or used whole. Boil or stir-fry well.
  • #220 MURASAKIIR OHANA FUJIMAME - (100 days)

  • This beautiful Japanese purple-flowering variety of the climbing hyacinth bean is particularly popular for eating. The green leaves contrast strikingly with their purplish stems and veins, and the flat, thick, curved pods are a dramatic red color. Young beans can be sliced or used whole, boiled or stir-fried.
  • #290 PURPLE MOON - (100 days)

  • This popular climbing hyacinth bean vine is grown for its beauty as much as for its beans. The plant growth is vigorous producing brilliantly colored red-purple flowers. The bean pods also red-purple in color, with a flat, thick and curved shape. Pick pods in a young stage. Young beans have a distinct flavor and taste better when they are slightly over-cooked. The beans can be sliced or used whole and prepared cooked such as boiled or stir-fried.

    Winged Bean

    aka shikaku mame, yi dou, sigarillas, dau rong
  • #218 WINGED BEAN - (75 days)

  • Every part of this climbing tropical bean - from the leaves and flowers to the pods and tubers - is edible and high in protein. The winged pods are best and most sweet when picked very young, about 3”-4” long. Cross-sectioned pods have four corners. Prepare these delicious beans as you would snap beans.

    BURDOCK

    aka gobo, niu pang
    Originally cultivated in China for medicinal purposes, this unique root has become a sought-after specialty in Japan. Flavorful and crunchy, burdock is an excellent source of fiber, vitamin B and minerals. Its nutty taste is delicious sautéed in combination with carrots or just some soy sauce and a bit of sugar, or it can be deep-fried in a tempura batter. Avoid rinsing this brown skinned vegetable until you’re ready to use it — in markets, it’s sold with the dirt still lingering to the roots because it is quick to wilt when washed. The white flesh immediately discolors once peeled. You’ll want to soak it in a mild vinegar solution until you’re ready to cook it to maintain the color. Sow seeds in spring and early fall.
  • #184 HA GOBO - (70 days)

  • Edible burdock root is gobo in Japanese and burdock leaf is ha gobo. This special Japanese variety is grown for its delicate edible burdock leaves. The thick white stalk is about 12” long and the light green leaves are tender. The edible root is about 6” long. Use leaves and roots parboiled in salads and ohitashi, fried in tempura, or for pickles.
  • #302 SALADA MUSUME - (100 days)

  • This early variety is a light skinned edible burdock or gobo that grows 12”-16” deep. It is easier to harvest because it is shorter in length than most gobo varieties, making it very suitable for home gardening. In Japan, this light skinned gobo is used fresh for salad and has a nice earthy aroma. Prepare root by scraping the skin with a sharp knife and cut root into match-stick size. Blanch and dress with a mixture of a little mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, salt, and sesame seed. This gobo can also be cooked and is the main ingredient for “kimpira”, made with sauteed burdock and carrots.
  • #070 TAKIN OGAWA - (120 days)

  • A special, late-variety burdock that is rich in flavor. It is the most popular variety in Japan. Mature plant can reach 3’ in height. Roots can be harvested in 4-5 months if planted in spring. Cut root into slivers and stir-fry. This important Japanese vegetable is essential to many classic Japanese dishes including “kimpira”, made with sautéed burdock and carrots. Burdock is rich in vitamin B and minerals.
  • #124 WATANABE EARLY - (110 days)

  • Burdock, also called gobo is highly prized as a nutritious delicacy in Japan and is a traditional Asian vegetable. This early variety matures faster than Takinogawa and has the same rich flavor with a slightly shorter, very tender root. Plants can grow up to 3’ tall. Recommended for spring sowing for summer harvest. Use in stir-fry, ohitashi, tempura or pickle. Prepare root by rubbing off the bark with the back of a knife. Cut thin slices and soak in water for about 2 hours to remove bitterness. A classic Japanese dish called kimpira is made with shaved pieces of burdock, julienned carrots, celery, all stir-fried in sesame oil with soy sauce, rice wine, sugar, and hot peppers.
  • #302 SALADA MUSUME - (100 days)

  • This early variety is a light skinned edible burdock or gobo that grows 12”-16” deep. It is easier to harvest because it is shorter in length than most gobo varieties, making it very suitable for home gardening. In Japan, this light skinned gobo is used fresh for salad and has a nice earthy aroma. Prepare root by scraping the skin with a sharp knife and cut root into match-stick size. Blanch and dress with a mixture of a little mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, salt, and sesame seed. This gobo can also be cooked and is the main ingredient for “kimpira,” made with sauteed burdock and carrots.
  • #070 TAKIN OGAWA - (120 days)

  • A special, late-variety burdock that is rich in flavor. It is the most popular variety in Japan. Mature plant can reach 3’ in height. Roots can be harvested in 4-5 months if planted in spring. Cut root into slivers and stir-fry. This important Japanese vegetable is essential to many classic Japanese dishes including “kimpira,” made with sautéed burdock and carrots. Burdock is rich in vitamin B and minerals.

    CHINESE CABBAGE

    aka nappa, hakusai, da bai cai, pechay, baguio, cai bac
    Whether it’s encountered in a Chinese stir-fry, pickled in Korean Kimchee or used in Japanese soups or sukiyaki, Chinese cabbage plays a principal role in Asian cuisine. Its mild delicate flavor makes it a welcome addition to a salad or sandwich, but it also makes the cabbage vulnerable to overcooking. In Asia, the vegetable is an important source of nutrition in winter. It is typically pickled in Japan and Korea and dried in China to be included in soups during the cold season. The varieties below represent the three main types of Chinese cabbage: barrel-shaped, cylindrical, also called Michihili, and loose-leaf. Fluffy Top Type
  • #195 KAISIN HAKUSAI - (70 days)

  • An elegant addition to any garden! The frilly outer leaves of this “fluffy top” loose head type Chinese cabbage are light green. They surround the core leaves, which are a soft yellow. Sow seeds late summer to early fall. Young leaves are ideal for salad, more mature leaves are traditionally steamed, pickled, or stir-fried with meat, tofu or other vegetables.
  • #008 AICHI - (70 days)

  • Produces large barrel heads with succulent midrib. Sow seeds in spring or late summer to early fall. These cabbages are milder and tenderer than their Western counterparts. A staple of Asian cuisine, they are the main ingredient in the spicy national dish of Korea, “Kimchee,” made by pickling cabbage, garlic red peppers and ginger. Also popular in Japanese soups and braised with meat in sukiyaki. Stir-fry or steam. Young leaves can be harvested for salad.
  • #013 BLUES, HYBRID - (50 to 60 days)

  • This well-known early hybrid nappa cabbage has many excellent qualities. It grows vigorously and is resistant to viruses, downy mildew, leaf spot, alternaria leaf spot, and bacterial soft rot. It is extra slow bolting. Mature heads can weigh over 4 lbs. Sow seeds in spring after last frost or late summer/early fall. Used in sukiyaki, yosenabe, ohitashi, stir-fries, pickling and salad.
  • #009 KYOTO No. 3 - (80 days)

  • This is a barrel head type Chinese cabbage. Sow seeds in late summer to early fall. This mild-flavored, wonderfully crisp cabbage will keep in a cool location for two to three months or can be frozen. Often used for pickling in Asia. Young leaves can be used in salad, stir-fry or steam.
  • #307 MINI KISAKU 50, HYBRID - (50 days)

  • This Chinese cabbage variety is a convenient size that that is easy to handle and will fit in a refrigerator. Unlike the large barrel type Chinese cabbage, Mini Kisaku weighs only 2-3 pounds. It is early maturing and can be harvested in approximately 50-55 days or when head feels firm. The interior of the head is yellow in color and very crisp. Sow seeds in spring to summer. This Chinese cabbage is suitable for stir-frying, pickling and perfect for salads.

    CUCUMBER

    aka kyuri, huang kwa, taeng kwa, khira
    Versatile and hardy, the cucumber carries a lot of weight in Asian cuisine. Most typically, cucumbers are pickled or eaten raw as the main ingredient in lightly dressed salads. The Chinese cut up very ripe fruit into soups, including the skin. Indian cuisine employs cucumbers in its yogurt-based raitas; in Thailand, the vegetables are grated with onions in a salad with lemon and fish sauce. In Japan, you’d be likely to encounter cucumbers in soups; in Korea, you’d find them more often in stir-fries. Asian cucumbers tend to be longer than their Western cousins. They also often have textured skin, or ridges, and a smaller seed cavity. Sow seeds in late spring to early summer. Start seeds indoors and transplant when weather warms.
  • #015 ARMENI AN - (50 days)

  • This popular, light green, ribbed, spineless cucumber is mild flavored, burpless and tasty. White flesh is crisp for easy slicing. This variety’s skin is thin and not bitter - no peeling needed. Most tasty when 12”-15” long, these cucumbers make a refreshing snack when marinated in slightly sweetened vinegar.
  • #366 ARMENI AN STRIPED – (65 to 70 days)

  • Valued for its flavor and attractive fruits, this cucumber is also known as snake melon. It is a heavy producer of light and dark green striped fruit that have a curved shape. An excellent slicer, the flesh is mild, sweet and crunchy. This variety requires a long and warm growing season. Use in salads and excellent for pickling.
  • #025 CALYPSO, F1 - (55 days)

  • This cucumber is small with white spines and medium green color. Calypso provides both a very high yield and superb disease resistance. Excellent for fresh eating and pickling.
  • #018 PALACE KING, HYBRID - (50 to 60 days)

  • This easy to grow, early maturing, sooyow type variety originates in Northern China. The defined ribbed fruits are best harvested 10” long and have fine white spines that are easily removed by washing. It is burpless, very crisp and has a thin skin that doesn’t need to be peeled. The vines are high yielding. It has a monoecious flowering habit (plant produces both male and female flowers.) Use sautéed, fresh in salads, pickled or marinated. Sooyow varieties are choice for pickling because of their crispy texture and small seed cavity.
  • #405 Progress, HYBRID - (50 to 60 days)

  • This excellent hybrid Japanese cucumber has smooth, glossy, green skin and tasty, crisp, burpless flesh. The excellent quality fruits mature to 8” long and 1” in diameter. Vigorous, high yielding plants are very heat tolerant and disease resistant to downy mildew, powdery mildew, anthracnose and CMV. It grows well in the open field and has a monoecious flowering habit (plant produces both male and female flowers) and sets many female flowers. Used for pickling or salads.
  • #143 SOOYOW NI SHIKI - (60 days)

  • Our most popular “sooyow” type cucumber. The fruit has ridges and white spines. It grows up to 11” long. The crisp and sweet fruit is used in salad. In Japan, a soup is made from chicken, ginger and cucumber wedges.
  • #391 SUMMER DANCE, HYBRID – (60 days)

  • Best known for its extremely uniform fruit, this hybrid grows vigorously and delivers a high yield from its many lateral vines. The mild tasting, deep green fruit are near perfect—straight with fine white spines on their glossy skin. They grow to about 9” long and more than 1” in diameter. Highly resistant to downy mildew and powdery mildew, it has an intermediate resistance to corynespora blight and target spot. This variety is suitable for open field growing and has a monoecious flowering habit (plant produces both male and female flowers.) Use for snacks, dipping, sandwiches and salads.
  • #392 SUMMER TOP, HYBRID – (60 days)

  • This excellent burpless hybrid is easy to grow and delivers a large yield of top-grade fruit. The cucumbers are uniform producing dark green fruit that grow to about 9-10” long. It is resistant to downy mildew, powdery mildew and other diseases. This variety is suitable for open field growing and has a monoecious flowering habit (plant produces both male and female flowers). Enjoy fresh in salads, pickled or cooked in soup.
  • #333 TASTY QUEEN 10, HYBRID - (60 days)

  • An extra early and high yielding hybrid variety from Japan that is very popular for open field or greenhouse growing. The slender fruits are very crisp, delicious and mature at 8” long and 1.5” in diameter. It has a monoecious flowering habit (plant produces both male and female flowers) and produces abundant female flowers and fruit over a long, productive harvest. Fruit are also carried on the lateral branches. Good for pickling and salads.

    EGGPLANT

    aka nasubi, ngai gwa, si kwa, ca, talong, makhua terung, cai tim, cai phao, brinjai
    Asian eggplants are milder and have a more delicate taste than Western varieties. The slender fruits vary in color from white with lavender streaks to a glossy purple-black. They need no peeling. The skins are thin and tender, adding a slight texture and sweet flavor to the flesh. In Japan, eggplants are often used in tempura, baked and served with a dipping sauce made of ginger and soy sauce, braised or pickled. They are more typically braised or fried in China, while in India, they are usually stuffed with meat and spices and baked. The mild flavor and porous flesh make them a perfect ingredient in a Thai curry dish, as they absorb the neighboring flavors. This is definitely a summer vegetable, unable to withstand cool weather. Start seeds indoors 6 weeks before last frost date and transplant when weather warms.
    Chinese / Taiwan Type
  • #152 BRIDE - (70 days)

  • The distinctive coloring of this late maturing Chinese eggplant makes it worth the wait. Glossy white skin is streaked with lavender and topped with a green calyx. The slender fruit grow up to 8” long. The size of these eggplants makes them ideal for grilling or for shish-kebabs, but the tender flesh is also delicious braised, fried, baked or stir-fried.
  • #119 PING -TUNG LONG - (75 days)

  • This is a prolific Taiwan variety that produces 12-16” long glossy purple-red fruit with green calyx. The erect plants are very sturdy, vigorous and resistant to bacterial wilt and can bear as many as 20 fruits each. This variety is tolerant of heat and moisture. Use stir fried, braised, steamed, deep-fried, baked or boiled. A popular Chinese dish stir-fries eggplant with bean sprouts, peppers and tomatoes.
    Japanese Type
  • #402 Black Shine, HYBRID - (65 days)

  • This Japanese hybrid eggplant has long fruit with black skin and a purple calyx. The shiny fruits have tender good quality flesh and grow over 8” long and weight over 8 oz. This extra early prolific producer is recommended for greenhouse and open field growing. Black Shine is very similar to Millionaire variety but fruit is heavier in weight. Use for grilling, stuffing, baking and pickling. Delicious when coated, baked or fried with miso. Makes excellent tempura..
  • #242 KAMO - (65 days)

  • A highly prized traditional kyo yasai or Kyoto vegetable, from the Kamo area of Japan, it has been a delicacy in that region for hundreds of years. This unique fruit is round with a flat bottom, purple-black skin, purple calyx and weighs up to 1/2 lb. Served at top restaurants in Japan, its dense flesh has a rich flavor. Use for stuffing, frying, and baking. Delicious when coated, baked or fried with miso.
  • #198 KYOTO EGG, HYBRID - (65 days)

  • This heat resistant Japanese eggplant is a generous producer of round type fruit that grow to 3” in diameter. The glossy skin below the purple calyx is a deep purple-black color, and the flesh is quite tender. The plant is upright. This variety is delicious deep- or stir-fried. Grill thin slices or add them directly to salads.
  • #243 MILLIONAIRE, HYBRID - (65 days)

  • One of the most popular Japanese eggplant hybrids sold in markets. This variety is an extra early, productive and upright grower. The brilliant black-purple fruit is long, growing to over 8” long. The skin is particularly soft, and the interior flesh is nearly seedless. Good for greenhouse, open field and home garden growing. Use for tempura, stir-fry, baking, grilling, and pickling. Try it stir-fried with garlic, onion, tomatoes, peppers and sesame oil.
  • #2, HYBRID OR SENR YONI GOU, HYBRID - (60 days)

  • This is a very popular variety in Japan. Excellent for home gardening, greenhouse, and field production. This variety will produce glossy black oval shape fruit up to 5” long with purple calyx. Fruit weight is approximately 3-4 ounces. Eggplant pickles are highly popular in Japan, and this variety is an especially good pickler. Japanese cooks submerge these in containers of miso (soybean paste) for three to four months. Deep fry, stir-fry, steam or bake.
  • #031 SHOYA LONG , HYBRID - (60 days)

  • This is a popular Japanese eggplant variety growing up to 14” long. The fruit is slender, purplish-black color and has a purple calyx. Early, productive variety for grade one, fine-quality long eggplant. Stir-fry, grill or use in tempura.
  • #197 YASAKANAGA, HYBRID - (60 days)

  • This easy to grow and early maturing Japanese eggplant hybrid produces slender 7” long fruits. The glossy, purplish-black skin is topped with a purple calyx. This variety is delicious deep- or stir-fried. Grill thin slices or add them directly to salads. Thai Type
  • #325 MASEGO, HYBRID - (70 days)

  • This excellent producer yields green rather than purple fruit. The firm, oblong eggplants are a glossy cucumber color that gives way to a variegated milky white at the blossom end. Masego is an early eggplant variety, with sturdy plants that show a very good tolerance to pests and diseases. The fruit maintain a good shelf life after harvesting.

    Bitter Melon

    aka niga uri, reishi, ku gua, fu kwa, ampalaya, mara, muop dang, karela
    Gourds have as many uses as they do shapes, colors and textures. Bitter Gourd is also known as Bitter Melon, Karella, and Balsam Pear. Bitter Melons are particularly good stuffed with meat, seafood or beans, as are hairy melons, especially when stuffed with pork and baked. Bottle and Calabash Gourds are excellent in meat soups or stir-fries. Young Luffas can be prepared just like zucchini. And while used in a variety of Chinese dishes, the Winter Melon is the key ingredient for the famous winter melon soup, popular at Chinese banquets. The soup is cooked in the melon itself, and chunks of melon flesh are scooped out and served with the soup. Gourds used for eating and cooking should be harvested young, as they tend to grow bitter the longer they are left on the vine. Sow seeds in late spring to early summer.
  • #063 BITTER GOURD LONG - (60 to 70 days)

  • This Japanese variety bitter gourd has green heavily warted skin and best flavor when harvested young at 10-13”. The fruits are crisp and tender. The climbing vine can reach 12’ and has yellow flowers. Bitter gourd prefers a warm climate and some humidity. Young fruit is delicious in soups, stuffed and in stirfries especially with pork and black beans. Young shoots and leaves are also edible. Recommended as a healthy food by the American Diabetic Association.
  • #365 BITTER MELON, HYBRID – (56-63 days)

  • This bitter gourd produces a generous crop of large, heavy and uniform fruits with distinctive vertically scored, shiny and warty green skin. Among the most bitter of vegetables, the flesh of the bitter gourd is crunchy and juicy, somewhat like a cucumber in texture. Use in soup, stir-fries and stuffed. Young leaf shoots are edible. Recommended as a healthy food by the American Diabetic Association.
  • #168 FUTO-SPINDLE - (70 days)

  • This small Japanese bitter melon is known for its tolerance to heat. The climbing vine can reach 12’ tall. Yellow blossoms yield to spindle-shaped melons with heavily warted dark green skin. Typical melons are 6”-8” long. Considered a delicacy by some, the leafy shoots and leaves are typically prepared by quick-frying. Most Asian cuisines stir-fry or steam the young melons or use them to enhance the flavor in soups.
  • #318 INDIA, HYBRID - (40 to 55 days)

  • The dark green skin of this hybrid’s 6-8” fruits are heavily warted. The spindle-shaped melons taper at both ends, and overall they are narrower than a Chinese bitter melon. Growers prefer this variety for its early maturity and long-lasting, generous yield. Popular in Indian dishes. Often prepared with potatoes and served with yogurt to offset the bitter flavor. Recommended as a healthy food by the American Diabetic Association.

    Winter Melon

    (togan, don kwa, kondol, phat, bi be, petha)
  • #226 BALLOON, HYBRID - (70 days)

  • A winter melon, this oblong wax gourd grows to 2-3 pounds, smaller than open pollinated varieties. The white-skinned fruit has a sweet, thick flesh. This variety is known for its excellent setting.
  • #170 OBLONG - (90 days)

  • Grown for its thick, white melon flesh; the wax gourd can reach 20 pounds and 12” length. The light green skin is covered with very fine hair and will form a white powder when ripe. The vine of this cold tolerant variety will spread. The waxy layer that forms over the ripe fruit protects the melon and allows for long storage periods.
  • #089 WINTER MELON ROUND - (90 days)

  • Grown for its thick, white melon flesh. This large melon can reach 20 pounds and 8” in diameter. The skin will form a white powder when ripe. The waxy layer that forms over the ripe fruit protects the melon and allows for long storage periods.

    Chinese Mustard

    (ha karashina, gai choi)
  • #049 GAI-CHOI - (57 days)

  • This popular, tasty mustard green is easy and quick to grow. Shiny green broad leaves have light green leaf stalks. A vigorous growing, semi-heading plant that is one of the main types of Chinese mustard grown. Pungency increases with maturity. Suitable for salads, soups, stir-fries or pickles. Rich source of vitamins A, B6, C, riboflavin and iron.
  • #399 Small GAI CHOI - (35 to 45 days)

  • This is a very vigorous and productive heirloom Chinese mustard green that is a non-heading type. The medium green leaves are tender and has good flavor. The plant is tolerant of heat and may bolt in spring and cold weather. Suitable for salads, soups, stir-fries or pickles. Rich source of vitamins A, B6, C, riboflavin and iron.

    PAK CHOI

    (shakushina, chingensai, tatsoi, tasai, bai cai, wu ta cai, pechay, phakkaat farang, cai thuong hai) This graceful vegetable with Chinese origins has spread throughout Asia and beyond, developing a wide range of varieties. The most typical Pak Choi features dark green leaves atop white spoon-shaped upright stems. Stems vary considerably in thickness and shape, and in some varieties they are green. One variety produces a rosette of dark green leaves close to the ground. There are specialty pak chois that have frilly leaves to light yellow-green color. The slight mustardy flavor of Pak Choi makes it a delightful addition to stir-fries, soups, noodle and meat dishes, and salads, if the young leaves are used. In China, the coarser leaves are often pickled. Some Chinese cooks also dip the leaves in boiling water and hang them out to dry in the sun for several days. Drying enables this highly perishable vegetable to be stored for winter months. Asian cooks use the entire plant at many stages of development. Sow seeds in spring to fall when temperatures are above 50°F. Green Stem Type (chingensai, shanghai pak tsoi, cai ngot trang nho)
  • #379 HANAKAN, HYBRID – (45 days)

  • This compact Japanese Pak Choi Hybrid is best known for its good uniformity and early maturity. It has very short green petioles that are thick and sturdy, supporting the dark green oblong leaf. The Hanakan variety may be sown year-round in warmer regions. It tolerates heat very well, continuing its vigorous growth, but cannot take the colder temperatures and may bolt early in early spring when the weather is cold. Hanakan is grown to be used for Baby Shanghai Pak Choy (Shanghai Miao). Like other varieties of Pak Choi (Bok Choy or Pak Choy) Hanakan is perfect for stir-fries, curries and soups. the first hybrid green stem dwarf Shanghai pak choi developed with heat/cold tolerance and bolt resistance. It has a uniform, erect, compact, tight vase-shape growing habit and weighs about 1/4 lb each. The petioles are tasty, crisp and tender. It is a good choice for home and field growing. With a wide growing adaptability, it is suitable for spring and fall sowings, and in cool regions summer sowing is also possible. Use in stir-fries, sauté, or braise.
  • #299 SAN FAN, HYBRID - (35 to 40 days)

  • This popular green pak choi or Shanghai pak choi hybrid has thick dark green leaves and light green petioles that are shaped like an hourglass. It is early maturing with uniform plant growth and excellent tolerance to heat. It adapts well to most areas provided temperatures stay in the 50-80°F range. A tender, easy to grow variety with excellent flavor and texture.
  • #059 SHANG HAI, PAK CHOI GREEN - (40 days)

  • This is a famous Asian green with dark green leaves and light green leaf stalks. To avoid bolting, plant later in cool areas. This variety is known for its heat-tolerance. Stir-fry or add to soup. The thick stalk of this variety is tender and extremely tasty.

    White Stem Type

    (shakushina)
  • #056 CHINESE PAK CHOI - (40 to 50 days)

  • This widely grown Asian green, also called bok choy, has smooth green leaves and thick white leaf stalks. It is one of the most popular Asian vegetables and a main ingredient in chow mein and stirfries. Can be steamed, stir-fried, and braised. Used in soups, for ohitashi and pickles.
  • #273 DWARF PAK CHOI - (40 days)

  • This is ‘Baby Bok Choy’, the famous Asian green. It is often referred to as a nai pe tsai type or dwarf type with white spoon-shaped petioles and dark green glossy leaves. This variety grows best in mild climates and can tolerate heat. It can be grown year-round in sub-tropical areas. Use stir-fried, sautéed, braised or add to soup.
  • #274 EXTRA DWARF PAK CHOI - (30 days)

  • This specialty pak choi variety is smaller than baby pak choi. It is similar to our Chinese Pak Choi and Dwarf Pak Choi varieties although smaller and more compact. This fast growing variety has curled, glossy, dark green leaves with short, thick white petioles. Can be grown year-round in sub-tropical areas. Use whole steamed, in stir-fries, boil, braise or add to soup.
  • #122 JOI CHOI, HYBRID - (40 to 50 days)

  • Growers love this hybrid pak choi for its uniformity. It is large, fast growing, vigorous and has bright green leaves and white petioles. At maturity, the plant is about 18” tall yet can be harvested when plants are still young and small. Recommended for areas where bolting is a problem when growing pak choi. A very adaptable variety that tolerates a wide range of temperatures. Can be steamed, stir-fried, and braised. Use in soups, for ohitashi and pickles.
  • #183 TAISAI - (50 days)

  • The attractive leaves of this pak choi have a distinctive soup-spoon shape. The 18” white stalks and glossy green leaves are taller and less compact than Chinese pak choi types, and the flavor is more concentrated. This variety has excellent tolerance to both heat and cold. Rich in vitamins, Taisai is quite popular in both Japanese and Chinese cuisine.
  • #062 TATSOI - (45 days)

  • This pak choi forms a flat rosette close to the ground with tender dark green, spoon-shaped leaves and short light green stalks. This very vigorous grower is cold tolerant and has a delicious, mild and mustard flavor. In warm weather, the plant is erect while in cold weather, the plant forms flat rosettes. Tatsoi is popular as a salad green. Plants can be harvested at any stage. The nutritious leaves are high in vitamins. Use in salad, soup and stir-fry.
  • #350 TATSOI SAVOY - (20 days baby leaf - 45 days mature)

  • Tatsoi Savoy appears more like a spinach than a pak choi. The heavily savoyed leaves are dark green, and they grow atop thick bunches of pale green petioles. At maturity, the plant reaches nearly a foot in height. As with the Tatsoi, individual leaves also can be picked continuously for several weeks. Tolerant of heat and cold, this pak choi, which is upright in the summer, grows in a rosette shape close to the ground in colder weather.
  • #328 TOY CHOY, HYBRID - (30 days)

  • This miniature pak choi has the same graceful white petioles and dark green leaves as other varieties, but it grows to only 5” tall. It’s an ideal addition to a home garden and is well suited for summer months, although it can be grown year-round in sub-tropical areas. The Toy Choy is early and is ready to harvest 30 to 35 days after sowing. Pak choi grows best in mild climates, yet it can tolerate some heat and cold. Bring out the best of this tender baby pak choi, or bok choy as it’s called in the West, by stir-frying it with ginger until stalks are tender but still crisp and leaves are just beginning to wilt.

    Chinese Parsley

    (korianda, koendoro, yuen sai, phak chee, ngo, dhania)
  • #356 LEISURE CILANTRO – (35 to 40 days)

  • Cilantro, also known as Chinese parsley, coriander or yan sui, is valued in Asian cuisine for its aromatic zesty flavor roduced in every part of the plant, from the leaves to the stems to the seeds. The plants grow up to 2’ tall and have medium-green feathery, flat leaves. Small 2” seedlings are ready to harvest after 18 days and can be used in dishes or as a garnish. Extra slow to bolt, this variety is good for mild climates. Cilantro goes to seed quickly in hot weather conditions. High in nutrition and flavor, chopped cilantro leaves complement meat, fish and poultry, noodle dishes and soups.

    RADISH

    (daikon, luo bo, labanos, hua piahs, cu cai trang, muli) The number and variety of radishes available are testimony to their importance in Asian cuisine. In the West a radish is typically round, small and red. Asian radishes, however, range in color from deep red or pink to green or white, in shapes from round to oblong to tapered, and in pungency from mild to spicy hot. While Western tastes generally prefer radishes in small amounts in green salads or as a garnish, in Japan and China the radish is more often pickled or cooked in some fashion, often in soups. It’s also a popular ingredient in stir-fries, stews and casseroles. When eaten raw, it is grated into a salad or carved into a beautiful garnish. The Chinese make a radish pudding, and pickled radish is a principal ingredient in Korean Kimchee. Asian cuisine also finds a resourceful use for the leaves, stems, seed pods and seedlings. Some varieties, in fact, are cultivated more for the greens than the root.

    Chinese Radish

  • #107 CHINA ROSE - (60 days)

  • China Rose is excellent for sprouts, also known as kaiware, and has pink stems with green leaves and a pungent radish flavor. This makes them a zesty and attractive addition to salads and sushi. This variety can also be grown for its root that has smooth rose-colored skin, white flesh and a hot pungency. The roots can mature to 2” in diameter and up to 8” long. Tops are tender, strong and tall. Sow seeds in spring/early summer. Radish leaves can be cooked by simmering them in chicken broth until tender and seasoning with butter and pepper. Use sprouts in salads, sushi and as a garnish.
  • #261 MANTANG HONG, HYBRID - (65 days)

  • This “beauty heart” type Chinese radish is the most popular variety grown in the middle and northern parts of China. Its flesh color can range from intense red to bright magenta. Because of their color, they are the perfect radishes to carve into flower shapes as garnish. The radish is round and has a green shoulder with white skin. It has a crisp texture and is mild and sweet flavored. Sow seeds in late summer to early fall. Try eating fresh. Just thinly slice, top with fresh squeezed lime and a little salt and pepper or with sugar.
  • #127 SHUNKYO - (30 to 40 days)

  • Originally from Northern China, this fast-growing early radish variety is easy to grow and has red-pink skin and white flesh. The roots have a hot, sweet flavor and the tops are tender and delicious. Sow seeds in spring after last frost or in late summer/early fall. The leaves are tasty stir-fried or pickled. Roots are excellent fresh in salads or pickled.
  • # 287 GIANT LUO BUO - (75 days)

  • This plump, oval shaped radish variety is very popular in Taiwan. The Giant Luo Buo can grow to 10” long and weigh over 2 pounds. The skin and flesh are milky white color, with a sweet and mild flavor. Sow seeds late summer to early fall. The mild flavor makes this radish excellent raw or added to braised dishes. Most commonly added to soups and simmered until the radish is soft and sweet in flavor.

    SESAME

    (goma, zhi ma) Sesame is fairly easy to grow in a hot, tropical climate and produces tan, black or white seeds that are delicious roasted and added to stir-fries, dressings, soups, and rice and noodle dishes. The seeds can also be crushed to extract oil or used to make Tahini. In Korea, the leaves, which are packed with vitamins, are eaten as well. Mature plants can reach 2’-3’ tall and are handsome, with pink or white flowers. Sow seeds in late spring to early summer.
  • #084 KING OMA - (85 days)

  • Sesame is one of the oldest cultivated herbs/spices in the world. This variety has a tan seed color and is easy to grow. ‘Open sesame’ refers to how the seed pods open. At maturity, the pods split and burst open. Seeds are used whole (fresh or toasted) or ground and added to ohitashi, stir-fries and salad dressings. Also used in baking. They are rich in calcium, vitamins C, E, fatty acids and lecithin.
  • #151 KUROGOMA - (85 days)

  • This tropical plant is grown for its black seeds. It does best in hot weather. Use seeds to flavor stir-fry or salad. Typically, seeds are roasted and then used whole, crushed or ground. Black sesame seeds are more pungent than the white variety. In Korea, the leaves are eaten.
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